Manchester City Council

Cheshire East Council

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Chief executive of Kent-owned alternative business structure Invicta Law resigns

Geoff Wild has resigned as chief executive of Invicta Law, the alternative business structure owned by Kent County Council, it has emerged.

The company’s entry at Companies House reveals that he resigned on 17 April.

Invicta Law was launched in June 2017, with the vast majority of Kent Legal Services’ 150 staff transferring to new offices in Maidstone. Wild was the Director of Governance & Law at the county council.

A spokesman for Invicta Law said: “For personal reasons, Geoff Wild has resigned as our CEO. Geoff has decided that, having seen Invicta Law established as a company, now is the right time to move his own career into new areas."

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Guy Record has been appointed as Interim Chief Executive Officer.

The spokesman confirmed that there would be no change in Invicta Law's strategic direction following Wild's departure.

In September 2016 the county council announced ambitious targets for revenue growth for the ABS. The aim was to grow turnover from £10.8m to £11.3m in Year 1, £17.8m in Year 5 and £29.8m in Year 10.

A report to Kent’s Cabinet in March this year referred to a £1.0m lack of dividend from Invicta Law “primarily due to a lack of new business being generated, compared to the business plan”.

However, the ABS has secured a number of appointments to legal services frameworks since its launch.

Earlier this month the ABS was appointed to the London and South East lots of the £46m framework run by the Crescent Purchasing Consortium, a procurement organisation owned by organisations in the further education sector.

In November 2017 Invicta Law was appointed to the £6.3m legal services framework operated by the London Boroughs Legal Alliance.

In July last year it won positions on six lots on the £2.5m per annum framework agreement set up by the WYLAW group of West Yorkshire local authorities and City of York Council.

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